Positive Work Culture in a Remote Environment

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3 people working remotely at a cafe

Building and maintaining a positive work culture can be a challenge even when people are in a traditional, in-person environment. What happens when that in-person experience is drastically decreased or removed completely?

Whether your organization has always worked remotely or it has recently gone through a change due to the pandemic or another reason, the importance of harnessing and nurturing organizational culture and climate is pivotal for employee productivity and retention.

There are a few considerations to make when maintaining a positive work culture remotely. How do the social aspects and metrics of culture and climate shift when the traditional environment is disrupted and changed to a hybrid or virtual setting? How do you stay connected in meaningful ways? How do you make sure employees feel appreciated, included, and heard? Here are a few tips to consider when cultivating a great work atmosphere for your employees to interact and thrive.

1. Mission- and values-based approach

By removing the physical proximity of a group, you must find other ways to connect in a holistic fashion. One way to accomplish this is through the company’s mission and values. A statement of purpose that is shared amongst one group is a way for everyone to feel a part of one common goal. The values of the organization apply a sense of integrity to the work being put forth by each member of the team.

2. Build a cohesive communication structure

Setting proactive communication best practices for one-on-one, team, and large group interactions will help support cohesive collaboration amongst team members and support a positive work culture. With the support of technology, you have the opportunity to build your processes and communication to cater to remote working first. Use tools and platforms, such as Cangrade’s Workforce Engagement tool, to support and streamline activities if every employee was fully remote.  By doing this there will always be an option to connect if some participants are in-person or not, further advocating for a flexible work environment, which positively increases positive work culture. This also allows for inclusivity in all activities wherever the participants may be.

3. Leadership-driven

A change in culture will be as successful as your leadership’s buy-in. As with any change, the employees will not take change seriously if the leadership team is dismantled over a shift in culture. By allowing leadership to have a part of the ownership and be collaborative over any shifts made, this may increase leadership buy-in and trickle out to their staff members.

4. Embrace Change

Be courageous in allowing the culture to change organically.  Continue to steer the culture in a positive direction but be willing and open to letting it evolve naturally based on the engagement you see. If the team does not enjoy something, a process is not working, or something that has always worked is no longer effective, make a change. Allow the population to feel heard by listening to them and adapting to the needs of the whole.

By considering how some of these suggestions might help grow your organization, you are already driving your work culture in a positive direction. If you would like support in your efforts or to see how Cangrade can complement your practices, please request a demo today.

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This post was originally published on the Cangrade blog.

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