What To Consider Before Buying A New Electronic Device

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A white iphone with a blank, powered-off screen lays flat on a hardwood floor directly in a beam of light.

You need not be a geek to want to take advantage of the latest electronic innovations and the best cameras available on mobile devices, laptops or computers. Regardless of your application, whether personal or professional use, newer devices usually promise a better overall experience. However, before you swipe, or key-in that credit card, think first about the following:

Protect privacy, data, and the environment

Every organization relies on data to drive business. At the same time, many businesses were brought into the home during the Covid-19 pandemic, increasing the amount and importance of data there, as well.

Assuming safeguards for data existed at the office and in the home, following best practices for secure data destruction as you upgrade your devices is also critical. Think about what you should do to responsibly get rid of the existing devices, to protect the environment and your data.

Buying the latest Apple iPhone 12, Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra, MacBook Air, or HP Pavilion 27All-in-One Desktop, etc. is a source of joy. However, that elation fades quickly when a data breach occurs because it was not properly destroyed on your older device before it was discarded.

Imagine waiting and saving to buy a sleek and shiny new device equipped with voice recognition software and artificial intelligence (AI). Then, imagine being hacked, and spending countless hours correcting your bank statements and months rectifying your credit scores, not to mention the aggravation.

Securely Destroy Data on your Current Device

Do It Right. The re-use, recover, recycle model is embraced by many consumers and adopted by many companies across the country. Logically, consumers care first and foremost about the information that is stored on their home or business device. Responding to that concern, Data Recycling NE immediately began providing a free, certificate of electronic data destruction to assure every owner that their data was safely and permanently destroyed. At the same time, parents notified us about personal information their children included-but-quickly-forgot on their tablets, while business owners fretted over their employees’ stored data. During nearly every call, we are asked how to securely destroy that data.

While the experienced professionals at Data Recycling New England often destroy the data electronically, certifying that it’s done properly, there are many who prefer the reassurance of complete hard drive destruction. Watching the hard drive as it is being shredded provides complete satisfaction, according to the reports of spectators at our facility. Businesses, especially those with large quantities of computers, can also watch the same process at their facility on a tablet we provide when Data Recycling NE’s mobile shredding unit is on-site.

Curiously, it is not only HIPPA and other highly regulated facilities and businesses that are requesting large collections of hard drives be physically shredded. In fact, we’ve received many inquiries about this process from a wide range of businesses and industries. Even this process is well documented for customers; we record serial numbers of each incoming device.

We focus on the environment and proper recycling, and, where applicable, a company’s bottom line. That means we re-purpose/re-use or re-sell/remarket items following secure data destruction.

Enhanced Lifestyle And Vigilance  in The Post-Covid World

As predicted, among consumers, the purchase of electronics post-Covid spiked dramatically and continues post-Covid. Technology innovations have been exciting, significantly impacting homes and businesses, and the way we do business at home. While each new device connects, streamlines and improves our lives and our lifestyles, it also increases our need to be vigilant about our data security. It is as important to properly take care of your old devices as it is the new.
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This post was written by Data Recycling NE

 

Data Recycling NE